Category Digital Humanities

Visualizing Networks of Anglo-Saxon Apocrypha

A while back, I had a twitter conversation about using network visualization tools online for studying the connections between medieval texts and manuscripts. After this exchange, I figured that others might be interested in seeing some of my work and, more specifically, how I went about it. My main interests in network visualizations so far […]

Getting Medieval in Virtual Reality

Last week I had my first fully immersive experience with virtual reality. I saw the future, and it is good.   My experience came about because of the generosity of someone I recently met, Adam Blumenthal, the Virtual Reality Artist-in-Residence at Brown University. Because of my work on our common reading program at RIC, I had invited Adam […]

Source Study in a Digital Age

Like many other medievalists, this past weekend I attended the International Congress on Medieval Studies at Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo. While there, I was privileged to present on a special session titled “Source Study: A Retrospective,” sponsored by the Sources of Anglo-Saxon Culture (my thanks to Ben Weber for organizing and for including me). I was […]

OCR and Medieval Manuscripts: Establishing a Baseline

[N.B. If you only skim this post, or read just a part of it, please jump to the last few paragraphs to read my call for help and collaboration.] Introduction Optical Character Recognition (OCR) software has increasingly been a part of scholarship, particularly in digital humanities. For example, it is fundamental to the Google Books […]

Day of DH Posts

The Day of DH came and went this past Tuesday (April 8), and the internet was abuzz with people’s activities. This year was the first time I got into the mix, since I found out about it only too late to participate last year. I spent my day with others at UConn who are interested in digital […]

Premodern Distant Reading? A Case of Hrabanus Maurus

One thing that I am continually interested in is how notions of “distant reading” (broadly understood) may be used to think about not only large corpora but also small corpora (as in my Judith project). A few weeks ago, I had a conversation with Yohei Igarashi (recently hired in English at UConn) about his work […]

Is There a Lab in This Class? Beyond Humanities Seminars

A few days ago, The Chronicle of Higher Education published a piece titled “Undergraduate Science Gains Are Tied to Hands-On Lab Experience,” by Paul Basken. The Chronicle article gives a summary of a study published by Tuajuanda C. Jordan et al. in the open-access journal mBio–and the Chronicle author, Basken, emphasizes the success of science students […]