Category Digital Humanities

Source Study in a Digital Age

Like many other medievalists, this past weekend I attended the International Congress on Medieval Studies at Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo. While there, I was privileged to present on a special session titled “Source Study: A Retrospective,” sponsored by the Sources of Anglo-Saxon Culture (my thanks to Ben Weber for organizing and for including me). I was […]

OCR and Medieval Manuscripts: Establishing a Baseline

[N.B. If you only skim this post, or read just a part of it, please jump to the last few paragraphs to read my call for help and collaboration.] Introduction Optical Character Recognition (OCR) software has increasingly been a part of scholarship, particularly in digital humanities. For example, it is fundamental to the Google Books […]

Day of DH Posts

The Day of DH came and went this past Tuesday (April 8), and the internet was abuzz with people’s activities. This year was the first time I got into the mix, since I found out about it only too late to participate last year. I spent my day with others at UConn who are interested in digital […]

Premodern Distant Reading? A Case of Hrabanus Maurus

One thing that I am continually interested in is how notions of “distant reading” (broadly understood) may be used to think about not only large corpora but also small corpora (as in my Judith project). A few weeks ago, I had a conversation with Yohei Igarashi (recently hired in English at UConn) about his work […]

Is There a Lab in This Class? Beyond Humanities Seminars

A few days ago, The Chronicle of Higher Education published a piece titled “Undergraduate Science Gains Are Tied to Hands-On Lab Experience,” by Paul Basken. The Chronicle article gives a summary of a study published by Tuajuanda C. Jordan et al. in the open-access journal mBio–and the Chronicle author, Basken, emphasizes the success of science students […]

What Would I Say: Social Media Poetics

I have a feeling I’m already behind the trend (with the high pace of digital culture, that’s often the case), but for the past week or so I’ve been mulling over the newly emerged social app called What Would I Say. In short, the online application accesses a user’s past activity on Facebook and generates […]

Digital Culture and Liberal Arts

I was recently prompted (for an application) to write “a statement articulating the role of the digital arts, media, and technology for informing and positioning traditional liberal arts disciplines for success in the 21st century.” I didn’t have such a statement on hand, and spent several days working on it. Over the past few years, I’ve written […]