Category Digital Humanities

The Afterlife of the Gospel of Pseudo-Matthew Preview

This post is essentially a teaser for my upcoming presentation at the International Congress on Medieval Studies in Kalamazoo next week. I’ll be presenting a paper titled “The Afterlife of the Gospel of Pseudo-Matthew” on session 41, “The Scripturesque Middle Ages: Uses/Reception of Apocrypha along the Medieval North Sea,” organized by Stephen Hopkins, in Sangren 1320, […]

Updating GitHub

Recently somebody I’m collaborating with on a project asked me if I had a GitHub repository. It came as a bit of a wake-up question for me. Why yes, I do, and I had mostly forgotten about it. In the back of my mind, I knew that my account was there, and I vaguely knew […]

Opening Access in Medieval Studies

The recent launch of Parker Library on the Web to the public via a new platform signals big news for medieval studies at the start of 2018. This 10th-anniversary upgrade to 2.0 brings with it compatibility with the International Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF) and a Creative-Commons Non-Commercial License, so images and other data are available to use and download for […]

Visualizing Networks of Anglo-Saxon Apocrypha

A while back, I had a twitter conversation about using network visualization tools online for studying the connections between medieval texts and manuscripts. After this exchange, I figured that others might be interested in seeing some of my work and, more specifically, how I went about it. My main interests in network visualizations so far […]

Getting Medieval in Virtual Reality

Last week I had my first fully immersive experience with virtual reality. I saw the future, and it is good.   My experience came about because of the generosity of someone I recently met, Adam Blumenthal, the Virtual Reality Artist-in-Residence at Brown University. Because of my work on our common reading program at RIC, I had invited Adam […]

Source Study in a Digital Age

Like many other medievalists, this past weekend I attended the International Congress on Medieval Studies at Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo. While there, I was privileged to present on a special session titled “Source Study: A Retrospective,” sponsored by the Sources of Anglo-Saxon Culture (my thanks to Ben Weber for organizing and for including me). I was […]

OCR and Medieval Manuscripts: Establishing a Baseline

[N.B. If you only skim this post, or read just a part of it, please jump to the last few paragraphs to read my call for help and collaboration.] Introduction Optical Character Recognition (OCR) software has increasingly been a part of scholarship, particularly in digital humanities. For example, it is fundamental to the Google Books […]