Tag Archives: manuscripts

Dealing with Holes in a Medieval Manuscript

One of the best parts of studying the medieval period is exploring the many idiosyncrasies of manuscripts. In fact, #medievaltwitter is great for this sort of fun, as medievalists post so many photos of manuscripts with strange elements. I’ve been able to do a bit more sustained thinking about the pleasures of manuscript details while […]

Visualizing Networks of Anglo-Saxon Apocrypha

A while back, I had a twitter conversation about using network visualization tools online for studying the connections between medieval texts and manuscripts. After this exchange, I figured that others might be interested in seeing some of my work and, more specifically, how I went about it. My main interests in network visualizations so far […]

Isidore of Seville & Old Media

Today marks 1380 years since of the death of Isidore of Seville (c.560-636), the famous sixth-/seventh-century Spanish archbishop and scholar. As a diverse writer, who synthesized ideas from the late antique world (including both pagan and Christian authors), his works were significant, influential, and highly popular touchstones for medieval thinkers. This British Library Medieval Manuscripts Blog […]

Notes on a Manuscript Fragment

Several months ago, wandering through the large Antique Flea Market in Brimfield, Massachusetts, I came across a surprise. Sitting on the ground, leaning against an old clothes trunk out in the sun, I saw from a distance a large page of antiquated musical notation and text in an old frame. As I walked closer, I recognized […]

Source Study in a Digital Age

Like many other medievalists, this past weekend I attended the International Congress on Medieval Studies at Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo. While there, I was privileged to present on a special session titled “Source Study: A Retrospective,” sponsored by the Sources of Anglo-Saxon Culture (my thanks to Ben Weber for organizing and for including me). I was […]

OCR and Medieval Manuscripts: Establishing a Baseline

[N.B. If you only skim this post, or read just a part of it, please jump to the last few paragraphs to read my call for help and collaboration.] Introduction Optical Character Recognition (OCR) software has increasingly been a part of scholarship, particularly in digital humanities. For example, it is fundamental to the Google Books […]