Tag Archives: manuscripts

Brooklyn Roads: A Manuscript Provenance Story

But as my mind walks through those placesI’m wonderin’What’s come of them…. Neil Diamond, “Brooklyn Roads” This is a story about trying to hunt down a medieval manuscript supposedly in the Brooklyn Museum. It all started when I agreed to contribute an introduction and translation of the Latin Life of Mary Magdalene for Tony Burke’s […]

Forthcoming: “Modelling Medieval Hands: Practical OCR for Caroline Minuscule”

A few years ago, I wrote a post about some preliminary experiments I ran using Optical Character Recognition (OCR) technology on medieval manuscripts. Fortunately, after I wrote that up, I had quite a bit of feedback from others who had used OCR with older printed books, and with languages like Latin and Greek. At one […]

That Serbian Book in Santa Clarita Diet

Apparently old books in pop culture media are becoming increasingly cool, or I’m just noticing them more lately. I get fired up every time I see manuscripts and early printed books in movies and television shows. A few recent examples include Athelstan’s Insular gospel-book in the Vikings television show, a book written in runes in Disney’s Frozen, […]

Opening Access in Medieval Studies

The recent launch of Parker Library on the Web to the public via a new platform signals big news for medieval studies at the start of 2018. This 10th-anniversary upgrade to 2.0 brings with it compatibility with the International Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF) and a Creative-Commons Non-Commercial License, so images and other data are available to use and download for […]

The Last Jedi Scriptures and Medieval Manuscripts

Since seeing Star Wars, Episode VIII: The Last Jedi, I can’t stop thinking about the books we see in the Jedi library on Ahch-To. To be honest, my mind was already going before seeing the movie, since the books stood out in the trailer. I wrote about them over on Forces of Geek based on what we see […]

Dealing with Holes in a Medieval Manuscript

One of the best parts of studying the medieval period is exploring the many idiosyncrasies of manuscripts. In fact, #medievaltwitter is great for this sort of fun, as medievalists post so many photos of manuscripts with strange elements. I’ve been able to do a bit more sustained thinking about the pleasures of manuscript details while […]

Visualizing Networks of Anglo-Saxon Apocrypha

A while back, I had a twitter conversation about using network visualization tools online for studying the connections between medieval texts and manuscripts. After this exchange, I figured that others might be interested in seeing some of my work and, more specifically, how I went about it. My main interests in network visualizations so far […]