Category Apocrypha

Two Thieves and a Funeral

Recently, I’ve been reading Mary Dzon’s new book, The Quest for the Christ Child in the Later Middle Ages (Philadelphia, PA: U of Pennsylvania P, 2017), and it’s turned out to be quite appropriate for the season of Lent leading up to Easter. This might seem somewhat odd, given the focus on Jesus’ childhood rather than […]

E-Clavis Entries

I’m happy to share two entries I’ve contributed to the e-Clavis for The North American Society for the Study of Christian Apocryphal Literature (NASSCAL): Gospel of Pseudo-Matthew Life of Judas As I’ve mentioned before, I’ve spent a lot of my time over the past year working on an introduction, translation, and commentary for the Gospel of Pseudo-Matthew. The e-Clavis […]

Refugee Jesus in the Gospel of Pseudo-Matthew

Recently, Casey Strine (Lecturer in Ancient Near Eastern History and Literature at the University of Sheffield) wrote for the Huffington Post UK about “Ancient Christianity’s Opposition To Trump’s Proposal To Prefer Christian Refugees.” In the article, Strine musters different passages in the Bible that speak to early Jewish and Christian responses to refugees, relating them […]

What Do We Learn about Baby Jesus From Apocrypha?

Just before Christmas, Mark Hay published a piece over at Vice about certain accounts of Jesus’ miracles as a child. Specifically, Hay discusses apocryphal (extra-biblical or non-canonical, different terms for these stories that aren’t in the Bible) stories in which (in his words) “Lil’ Jesus used his divine powers to terrorize teachers, kill Jewish children, and […]

A Tale of Two Women: Anna & Mary in Advent

During the season leading up to Christmas known as Advent, the Christian story of Jesus’ birth is often a centerpiece of Western culture. Yet many Christians also celebrate another miraculous story during this time: the Conception of the Virgin Mary, Jesus’ mother. The feast day is traditionally observed on December 8, exactly nine months before the […]

Attending the York Christian Apocrypha Symposium

A few weeks ago, I was fortunate to attend the York Christian Apocrypha Symposium in Toronto, Canada, organized by Tony Burke in consultation with Brent Landau. You can learn more about the conference, presenters, and papers delivered here. I was a medievalist in a sea of experts on early Christianity–a field to which I often look in my own research and […]

#RhymeYourPhD

Something wonderful is happening on Twitter. Of course, that could be said of various trends on that social media outlet, but one that’s striking early academics right now is the #RhymeYourPhD trend. Liesbeth Corens brought the idea to life over the weekend: Now I want ‘Rhyme your PhD’ like ‘dance your PhD’. Could be part of our ‘creative […]