Author Archives: Brandon W. Hawk

Bonus Round: “Medieval” Games on Steam

This post is meant as a follow-up to my previous thoughts about medievalists telling medieval stories. In that piece, I begin by considering a video game and end with reflections on the larger implications for storytelling about the Middle Ages. After writing it, I got to thinking about other medieval video games, so decided to […]

Telling Medieval Stories: Prolegomenon

Some of my readers might have seen when I took to Twitter yesterday for a rant about representations of the medieval period in pop culture. It began with a video game and ended with some arguments about needing more medievalists telling better stories for more audiences. I want to offer an extended version of my […]

Dealing with Holes in a Medieval Manuscript

One of the best parts of studying the medieval period is exploring the many idiosyncrasies of manuscripts. In fact, #medievaltwitter is great for this sort of fun, as medievalists post so many photos of manuscripts with strange elements. I’ve been able to do a bit more sustained thinking about the pleasures of manuscript details while […]

Visualizing Networks of Anglo-Saxon Apocrypha

A while back, I had a twitter conversation about using network visualization tools online for studying the connections between medieval texts and manuscripts. After this exchange, I figured that others might be interested in seeing some of my work and, more specifically, how I went about it. My main interests in network visualizations so far […]

Saint Matthew and Apocryphal Gospels

September 21 is the Feast of Saint Matthew, Apostle and Evangelist, in the Western church. With these titles, he’s most well known as one of Jesus’ twelve disciples in the gospels, and for his role as writer of his own Gospel. He’s also patron saint of accountants, bankers, tax collectors, perfumers, and civil servants–because he […]

CFP: Preach It, Sister! A Roundtable about Women and Homiletics

CFP: Preach It, Sister! A Roundtable about Women and Homiletics Sponsored by the Society for the Study of Anglo-Saxon Homiletics at the 53rd International Congress on Medieval Studies Western Michigan University (Kalamazoo, MI), May 10-13, 2018 For over ten years at the International Congress on Medieval Studies, the Society for the Study of Anglo-Saxon Homiletics […]

Diversifying SASLC

Over the past several years, I’ve become increasingly involved in the long-standing project known as the Sources of Anglo-Saxon Literary Culture (SASLC). First, I joined the project as a contributor, working on a series of entries (Pseudo-Bede) that seemed, at the time, untouchable. In 2014, I took on a role to help the project increase […]