Category Apocrypha

A Tale of Two Women: Anna & Mary in Advent

During the season leading up to Christmas known as Advent, the Christian story of Jesus’ birth is often a centerpiece of Western culture. Yet many Christians also celebrate another miraculous story during this time: the Conception of the Virgin Mary, Jesus’ mother. The feast day is traditionally observed on December 8, exactly nine months before the […]

Attending the York Christian Apocrypha Symposium

A few weeks ago, I was fortunate to attend the York Christian Apocrypha Symposium in Toronto, Canada, organized by Tony Burke in consultation with Brent Landau. You can learn more about the conference, presenters, and papers delivered here. I was a medievalist in a sea of experts on early Christianity–a field to which I often look in my own research and […]

#RhymeYourPhD

Something wonderful is happening on Twitter. Of course, that could be said of various trends on that social media outlet, but one that’s striking early academics right now is the #RhymeYourPhD trend. Liesbeth Corens brought the idea to life over the weekend: Now I want ‘Rhyme your PhD’ like ‘dance your PhD’. Could be part of our ‘creative […]

An Ox, an Ass, and Three Kings: A History of Apocryphal Christmas Traditions

This time of year, holiday symbols surround us on all sides. Some of these are fairly recent phenomena, like Santa Claus (a twentieth-century creation in his popular culture incarnation), electric lights, and decorated fir trees in many homes; some are much older, like Hanukkah menorahs and Nativity scenes. Among those associated with Christmas are a few that particularly […]