Author Archives: Brandon W. Hawk

Public Writing Round-Up

This post is a sort of follow-up to a few others in which I’ve written about my own work turning toward public writing. Fortunately, other academics have laid the groundwork in this field. This type of work is not uncommon. And my own thinking has not been in a vacuum–I’ve been influenced by some smart […]

Translation as Public Writing

I’ve been thinking about translation more and more over the past several years. Partly, this is because I find myself needing to translate more obscure texts for my own research. But one of my goals with some of my projects has also been to make obscure or lesser known medieval texts accessible to broader audiences. More medieval texts need to be […]

Teaching Writing for the Public

Last summer, I participated in a week-long Summer Seminar on the Teaching of Writing (SSTW) hosted through our campus Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning. The Seminar has continued in some ways, as our group of faculty have met twice a semester to share how we’ve been implementing some of our ideas into our classes. […]

Two Thieves and a Funeral

Recently, I’ve been reading Mary Dzon’s new book, The Quest for the Christ Child in the Later Middle Ages (Philadelphia, PA: U of Pennsylvania P, 2017), and it’s turned out to be quite appropriate for the season of Lent leading up to Easter. This might seem somewhat odd, given the focus on Jesus’ childhood rather than […]

Forthcoming: “Omnis piger propheta est”

I was recently asked to contribute a piece for a forthcoming Festschrift in honor of Michael E. Stone, a scholar whose work on early Jewish and Christian pseudepigrpaha and apocrypha has affected many of my own views on these subjects. I’m very pleased to be included in this collection, with a piece titled “‘Omnis piger propheta est‘: An […]

E-Clavis Entries

I’m happy to share two entries I’ve contributed to the e-Clavis for The North American Society for the Study of Christian Apocryphal Literature (NASSCAL): Gospel of Pseudo-Matthew Life of Judas As I’ve mentioned before, I’ve spent a lot of my time over the past year working on an introduction, translation, and commentary for the Gospel of Pseudo-Matthew. The e-Clavis […]

Refugee Jesus in the Gospel of Pseudo-Matthew

Recently, Casey Strine (Lecturer in Ancient Near Eastern History and Literature at the University of Sheffield) wrote for the Huffington Post UK about “Ancient Christianity’s Opposition To Trump’s Proposal To Prefer Christian Refugees.” In the article, Strine musters different passages in the Bible that speak to early Jewish and Christian responses to refugees, relating them […]