Author Archives: Brandon W. Hawk

First-Day Catullus

This summer, I’ve been creating a syllabus and preparing for one of the courses that I’m teaching this fall, World Literature I: Ancient through Early Modern. The syllabus can be found here, and I’ve decided to use the The Norton Anthology of World Literature, Package 1: Beginnings to 1650 (vols. A, B, C), since it has great breadth […]

Ælfric’s Preface to Genesis: A Translation

Some time back, I noticed that quite a few people who came across my Academia.edu profile found it because they were searching for a translation of Ælfric of Eynsham‘s Preface to Genesis (about which I’ve written an article in English Studies). I did some searching of my own, and found that there are not many translations of the […]

Review of Tolkien’s Beowulf

Over the last several weeks, I’ve been reading the long-awaited, recently published Beowulf: A Translation and Commentary, by J. R. R. Tolkien, edited by Christopher Tolkien (CT). Of course, the internet has been abuzz about this release for quite a while, and reviews have shown up here and there. I decided early in my reading that […]

Review of Frans van Liere’s An Introduction to the Medieval Bible

Many scholars and teachers of the Bible in the medieval period know that a general introduction to the subject is hard to find. There is, of course, the monumental Cambridge History of the Bible (volume 2), as well Beryl Smalley’s The Study of the Bible in the Middle Ages, which remains a landmark, thought it focuses mainly on the twelfth […]

Day of DH Posts

The Day of DH came and went this past Tuesday (April 8), and the internet was abuzz with people’s activities. This year was the first time I got into the mix, since I found out about it only too late to participate last year. I spent my day with others at UConn who are interested in digital […]

Premodern Distant Reading? A Case of Hrabanus Maurus

One thing that I am continually interested in is how notions of “distant reading” (broadly understood) may be used to think about not only large corpora but also small corpora (as in my Judith project). A few weeks ago, I had a conversation with Yohei Igarashi (recently hired in English at UConn) about his work […]

Review of Tony Burke’s Secret Scriptures Revealed

In Secret Scriptures Revealed: A New Introduction to the Christian Apocrypha (Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 2013), Tony Burke offers an excellent tour for all those interested in the subject. The book presents a lucid, accessible introduction appropriate to newcomers as well as anyone looking for a big-picture approach to the subject. Burke demonstrates clear knowledge […]