Author Archives: Brandon W. Hawk

How I #KeepJoyInScholarship on the Tenure Track

When my friends Micah Goodrich, Bre Leake, and I came up with the #KeepJoyInScholarship hashtag on Twitter, I was fairly new to my job. I was in my first semester of my first year at Rhode Island College, after a year as a teaching post-doc, and I was learning to navigate life as a tenure-track […]

Will the Real King Arthur Please Rise?

This week we’ll witness the release of yet another movie about perhaps the most famous ruler from the medieval period, King Arthur. The film, directed by Guy Ritchie, is titled King Arthur: Legend of the Sword. From what is shown in the trailer, the story depicts the rise of Arthur (Charlie Hunnam) from nobody orphan to leader of the people pitted against tyrannical […]

Public Writing Round-Up

This post is a sort of follow-up to a few others in which I’ve written about my own work turning toward public writing. Fortunately, other academics have laid the groundwork in this field. This type of work is not uncommon. And my own thinking has not been in a vacuum–I’ve been influenced by some smart […]

Translation as Public Writing

I’ve been thinking about translation more and more over the past several years. Partly, this is because I find myself needing to translate more obscure texts for my own research. But one of my goals with some of my projects has also been to make obscure or lesser known medieval texts accessible to broader audiences. More medieval texts need to be […]

Teaching Writing for the Public

Last summer, I participated in a week-long Summer Seminar on the Teaching of Writing (SSTW) hosted through our campus Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning. The Seminar has continued in some ways, as our group of faculty have met twice a semester to share how we’ve been implementing some of our ideas into our classes. […]

Two Thieves and a Funeral

Recently, I’ve been reading Mary Dzon’s new book, The Quest for the Christ Child in the Later Middle Ages (Philadelphia, PA: U of Pennsylvania P, 2017), and it’s turned out to be quite appropriate for the season of Lent leading up to Easter. This might seem somewhat odd, given the focus on Jesus’ childhood rather than […]

Forthcoming: “Omnis piger propheta est”

I was recently asked to contribute a piece for a forthcoming Festschrift in honor of Michael E. Stone, a scholar whose work on early Jewish and Christian pseudepigrpaha and apocrypha has affected many of my own views on these subjects. I’m very pleased to be included in this collection, with a piece titled “‘Omnis piger propheta est‘: An […]