Last July, I posted a translation of Ælfric of Eynsham‘s Old English Preface to Genesis for the benefit of those interested in a modern rendering. Since then, I’ve been overwhelmingly pleased by the attention it’s garnered–over 1,300 views as of this posting! In the same spirit, I’m now posting my translation of Ælfric’s Libellus de Veteri Testamento et Novi (Little […]

Like many other medievalists, this past weekend I attended the International Congress on Medieval Studies at Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo. While there, I was privileged to present on a special session titled “Source Study: A Retrospective,” sponsored by the Sources of Anglo-Saxon Culture (my thanks to Ben Weber for organizing and for including me). I was […]

This academic year was Year One after my PhD, which I defended early last August, just in time to move for a teaching postdoc in English at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville. My year at UTK has been filled with great experiences and opportunities, so as the spring semester (and the academic year) comes to an end, I’m reflecting on it […]

[Edit: Interested in more about OCR with medieval manuscripts? Check out this more recent post.] Introduction Optical Character Recognition (OCR) software has increasingly been a part of scholarship, particularly in digital humanities. For example, it is fundamental to the Google Books project (which so many use for research), corpus creation and curation, and various aspects […]

By now, the news of the Anglo-Saxon recipe that kills modern day superbug MRSA is old (find a good article on it here). When news hit the internet a few weeks ago, my social media was buzzing with medievalists proud to point out the relevance of our work. I first found out about it because Judy (my […]

Something wonderful is happening on Twitter. Of course, that could be said of various trends on that social media outlet, but one that’s striking early academics right now is the #RhymeYourPhD trend. Liesbeth Corens brought the idea to life over the weekend: Now I want ‘Rhyme your PhD’ like ‘dance your PhD’. Could be part of our ‘creative […]

This time of year, holiday symbols surround us on all sides. Some of these are fairly recent phenomena, like Santa Claus (a twentieth-century creation in his popular culture incarnation), electric lights, and decorated fir trees in many homes; some are much older, like Hanukkah menorahs and Nativity scenes. Among those associated with Christmas are a few that particularly […]